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GWise
December 8th, 2013, 11:46 PM
I was planning to post this a little later, but there's enough activity going on I figured I'd forget if I didn't start logging it here.

About 2.5 Years ago, I sold my Caterham Classic to fund the purchase of our house. I'd always loved the Caterham, but I'd lusted after an original Lotus 7 to do some Vintage Racing.

Last June I had the opportunity to fly out to Dallas to look at a 1963 Lotus Super 7 S2 Vintage Race Car.

http://i42.tinypic.com/345djb5.jpg
http://i43.tinypic.com/2564g8m.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/347tdzr.jpg

Here are the specs as purchased:
1963 Lotus 7 S2 with additional triangulation
Crowther Racing Engines Built Pre-Crossflow: Dry Sump, Dual Weber 40's, MSD ignition
3.9 Rear end with Quaife LSD (spare 3.5 with Quaife ready to bolt on)
Quaife Dog-Box Transmission
1008 pounds
2 sets of Minilites (1 set magnesium)
Extras: Full Interior and weather gear, 1700cc long rebuilt, baffled pan, spare axle among lots of other spares.

It was owned by a gentleman in his 70's that could no longer go vintage racing. He had owned the car since 1988 and had driven it a little on the street, but mostly it was a race car. I was told it had been in an accident in 2004 (not surprising since it had been a race car) and had been totally rebuilt over the course of 3 years. Due to the large number of spares and the heavy spare long block, I couldn't find anyone willing to ship it for me.

I inspected the car, made a deal, grabbed a rental truck and trailer, removed all the bodywork (to minimize stone chips), loaded it up and headed over to a friend's place right outside of Dallas. I had planned to do a 2 day, 1800 mile drive so I could minimize the time away from work.

http://i41.tinypic.com/1zob2pd.png

I set off from Dallas and made my way across Hwy 40 without any problem until I started to smell anti-freeze at the texas/new mexico border. I pulled over and had a look, but couldn't find any coolant leak, so I kept on. I drove a while, but the smell kept getting stronger and stronger. It turns out the heater core was soaking the car cover I'd set in the passenger footwell. There was nowhere to stop, so I kept on (hoping for the best) until I got to Albuquerque at about 8pm. I had only covered about 700 miles, so I figured it was going to turn into a 3 day trip. I called the rental company to have the truck fixed the next morning, but since it was a Sunday nobody was around to fix it. They sub-contracted a mechanic that looked like he was from the cast of breaking bad to come out and take a look, but a new heater core was 2-3 days away. Luckily, I was able to convince them to bypass the heater core and I was on my merry way. I left Albuquerque around 10AM and was able to drive straight through 1100 miles to San Jose where I arrived at 4am Monday morning and unloaded the car. I did get up at 7am for work on Monday morning and made it all the way through the workday.

I'll post more in the next few days...

moosetestbestanden
December 9th, 2013, 07:15 AM
Well, I guess I'm the 1st to offer congratulations. So, congratulations! Well bought - there ain't nothing like the real thing as the song goes.

For the record, I'm from Albuquerque (lovingly referred to as Al-co-hol-que. Hic!). Your experience there should be considered normal. I hope you had some green chile stew while there. Yum.

GWise
December 9th, 2013, 09:55 AM
Thanks Chris. It was 90 degrees in Albuquerque when I arrived at 8pm, so I wasn't in the mood for stew. I really thought Albuquerque and the rest of western NM was beautiful and plan to stay for a longer duration in the near future.

After getting home, I found a name and address on a few boxes. As it turns out, the name wasn't quite spelled right, but I was able to find him since he was the president of bucknell university. I few tries to email and phone numbers listed were no good. I found his wife's name through a newspaper article and through looking her up, I was lucky enough to finally get through to him.

Apparently he bought the car in 1973 around Tulsa, OK and raced it throughout the 70's and 80's, finally selling it to the gentleman I purchased it from in 1988. He said it had been restored in the early 80's by a shop called Ecurie Motors. Ecurie was run by Peter Law, an ex-penske mechanic and father of future grand-am driver darren law. He did confirm that the car was a cosworth (I have the cosworth valve cover), but said he couldn't remember who he bought it from or what the history of the car was.

He was able to send me some pictures of the car as he first purchased it:

http://i40.tinypic.com/e98zly.jpg

Interesting Cage, isn't it? I'm still trying to locate the car's history prior to 1973, but I haven't had much luck.

Mondo
December 9th, 2013, 07:37 PM
Should be lots of fun... enjoy

breezy7
December 9th, 2013, 10:41 PM
Try contacting simplesevens.org about the your car's history, here is a link http://www.simplesevens.org Very nice car and looks to be in great shape.

escondidoron
December 9th, 2013, 11:43 PM
Very cool. Beautiful car. It'd be fun to compare notes with you regarding my unrestored old '62 S2.

GWise
December 10th, 2013, 12:25 AM
Hi breezy,

I've contacted John, but he doesn't have any further information (nor does the lotus 7 registry) about my car. I've sent him the info on my site in hopes that someone may stumble across it eventually.

Ron - I'd be happy to chat with you and thank you. It's not quite as beautiful at the moment, but I'm working on it.

Thanks Mondo.

Since the bank account still needs to recover, I decided to put off vintage racing for a few years and enjoy the car on the street. I'd rather not run the car on Race Gas and the dog ring transmission/tilton racing clutch is no good for the street.

Titling the car in California with a 1988 Title from Texas was interesting. The title was basically a piece of paper that said 1963 Lotus Super 7 and the chassis number. The whole process took 2 DMV trips and about 3 hours to get done. They put the VIN down as the chassis number, paid my dues and I was on my way. Seems all they really want is your money after all.

The next problem was sourcing a head to be able to run on pump gas. Unfortunately that large supply of spares didn't include a head. I asked around with local Lotus 7 owners and managed to come across a 116e head that needed to be welded up for free.. I took it in to the machine shop, waited about 3 months, then they had it welded, waited another 2 months and they did the porting, cut and installed larger valve seats (hardened for exhaust), installed the valve guides and did the port match. I am running Twin Cam Valves as even big GT valves are a still bit small and hard to come by. Since the long block has a cast Crank, I don't plan on spinning it really high.I didn't do a whole bunch of trick things to the head yet for this reason. If I had known it was going to take this long, I would have waited as I saw some decent heads come and go on ebay for much less than I spent.
http://i43.tinypic.com/vo5ssz.jpg
http://i42.tinypic.com/2wrqnie.jpg

I had planned to run the baffled wet sump on the street, but I cant seem to find a dipstick and tube for the pre-crossflow. This is forcing me to run a dry sump on the street. It isn't such a bad thing as I'll get more ground clearance this way. The problem is the oil tends to drain from the sump to the bottom of the tank. Do any of you guys that run dry sumps have this problem? How did you solve it?

I was able to source an old lotus elan transmission that had run low on oil and had been sitting in a shed for a good 15 years. I pulled it apart, replaced the main bearings, roller bearings on the layshaft and all the seals. I was expecting the gears and synchros to be pretty worn, but it actually looked really good. We'll see how much noise it makes when I get it running. The 3/4 shift fork was pretty worn, but I had a spare that wasn't too bad. I plan to have the old one braised back to the original height and machined flat.
http://i41.tinypic.com/148kuoz.jpg
http://i44.tinypic.com/5vg2g.jpg

The other thing I found when I pulled the motor was that the transmission mounting on the tailshaft was different. The prior owner had adapted the E-Type Motor mounts for use on this transmission, but the elan transmission had a different mount on the tailshaft. Unfortunately, the recess for the bearing does not allow the tailshafts to simply be swapped, so I bought an elan motor mount for the later style transmission and my next job will be figuring out how to mount it in the car.
Older Style
http://i42.tinypic.com/r7p4x4.jpg
Newwer Style
http://i42.tinypic.com/mt5mqr.jpg

I thought the head was my rate limiting step until I had a closer look at the chassis...

escondidoron
December 11th, 2013, 10:11 PM
Not sure I would describe the black transmission as "old" and the bluish one as "new". Here's a pic of the transmission in my '62 taken when I had the engine out to install a new clutch this past summer:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7105/7126981319_bd4bed706e_b.jpg

Note that the mount boss on the tailshaft housing casting on your bluish unit looks very much like like the one on my transmission.

As far as I know, the 113e 'box fitted to my car is the original unit. The 113e Type 4 transmission dates to about September of '62 from what I have read. According to Lotus records my car was originally shipped from Cheshunt in December of that year.

GWise
December 15th, 2013, 07:56 PM
Interesting about the transmission mount. All the elan transmissions have the block of aluminum, so I assumed the one with the 2 bolts and jaguar motor mount was the old style. Either way, I've figured out a way to make it work.

Just before I had the motor out I discovered this:

http://i39.tinypic.com/ae1u87.jpg

I found someone to do the braise welding, but he is about an hour away. Two weekends now he's called me at the last minute to say he doesn't have room in the shop. My ability to get this done by the new year is slowly slipping away...

moosetestbestanden
December 16th, 2013, 05:58 AM
Interesting about the transmission mount. All the elan transmissions have the block of aluminum, so I assumed the one with the 2 bolts and jaguar motor mount was the old style. Either way, I've figured out a way to make it work.

Just before I had the motor out I discovered this:

I found someone to do the braise welding, but he is about an hour away. Two weekends now he's called me at the last minute to say he doesn't have room in the shop. My ability to get this done by the new year is slowly slipping away...

At least I'm not the only one who has had to wait on a welder.:-O

I hope you've looked everywhere. If you've got to do it once you don't want to have to do it again. It looks like a lot of paint on that frame...

GWise
January 19th, 2014, 09:03 AM
Time for a bit of an update:

I was able to drop off the car just after christmas. It was supposed to be done last weekend, but he still hasn't started.

After I purchased all my parts, I realized that the "expert" that sold me the headgasket didn't quite know what he was talking about. Running the static compression with this head gasket put me at 11:1. I was targeting just under 10.5 to run on pump gas, so I found a thicker headgasket from burton power that puts me at 10.2:1. The same guy sent me pressure plate bolts that were fine instead of coarse thread.

After painting the head, I realized the supplied paint doesn't quite match the block. I'm headed down to the auto parts store today to see if I can find something that more closely matches.

Test fitting of the head showed that shims were needed between the rocker posts and the head. I made up a few from sheet steel and added a hole for oiling.

Anyway, I'm waiting again. Hopefully the gasket should get here in the next few days and I can finish putting together the engine and bolt up the transmission.

http://i39.tinypic.com/120tgfp.jpg
http://i43.tinypic.com/256urmb.jpg
http://i43.tinypic.com/2jfkupt.jpg

Doug Liedblad
January 19th, 2014, 02:38 PM
The head color looks like a GM orange from the 60's.

How did you determine the compression ratio?

GWise
January 19th, 2014, 05:09 PM
Yeah, I agree it looks quite orange in the photo. It doesn't actually look that orange to me, but maybe I'm going color blind...

For the compression ratio, I used Dave Bean's calculation listed in his parts manual. (sorry, scanner is broken)
http://i40.tinypic.com/10wkx2a.jpg

I also used this online calculator to back up my calculation: http://www.csgnetwork.com/compcalc.html

GWise
January 19th, 2014, 05:18 PM
By the way doug, I spotted this while doing some googling the other day:

http://motormavens.com/2012/05/supercar-sunday-woodland-hills/

moosetestbestanden
January 20th, 2014, 06:46 AM
By the way doug, I spotted this while doing some googling the other day:

http://motormavens.com/2012/05/supercar-sunday-woodland-hills/

Well, I guess that Doug's famous now. And the dude in the Locost was probably pulled for no license plate - at least there were none visible in the photos.

Was that one frame failure point the only one?

GWise
January 20th, 2014, 09:44 AM
Yes, thankfully.

Doug Liedblad
January 20th, 2014, 02:09 PM
Did you CC the head? Everything else can be calculated from bore and stroke. That's the only way to really get the compression ratio.

GWise
January 20th, 2014, 05:01 PM
Yes, I checked the head volume. Since they are new valves, they still seal quite nicely and it was easy enough to check with a graduated cylinder and some gasoline.

Doug Liedblad
January 20th, 2014, 07:06 PM
Well, I guess that Doug's famous now......

Can I be infamous instead?

moosetestbestanden
January 21st, 2014, 05:57 AM
Yes, thankfully.

Did you or are you going to strip it and re-paint it when (or is it if?... welders...) you get it back.

This is a cool project. Keep us posted please. :-)

GWise
January 22nd, 2014, 09:53 AM
Can I be infamous instead?

I think you could drive around without a license plate as a start...

I plan to repaint when it comes back from the fabricator. Not holding my breath for "when."

In the mean time, I purchased this used 2lb coast fabrication muffler for $50 (normally $300). It's small in size, but these units are surprisingly effective and since I have a LHD pre-crossflow I'm trying to get as much weight off the left side as possible.

http://i40.tinypic.com/2h2p0tz.jpg

Doug Liedblad
January 22nd, 2014, 11:56 AM
Thanks! The police do watch this type of forum, now they'll be looking for me.

They might be already.

prabjohns
January 22nd, 2014, 12:06 PM
Great picture of you Doug!
The title of the MotorMavens article is 'Sex on Wheels'. I'm presuming that refers to the drivers rather than the cars………..

moosetestbestanden
January 24th, 2014, 06:15 AM
Plucked this (http://www.myautoproject.com/2012/09/1970-lotus-super-7-restoration/) from an item found by somebody over on BC.

Not sure if it has anything of use, but it couldn't hurt to look!

GWise
January 25th, 2014, 10:45 AM
Interesting... a turbo carbureted twin cam. Not sure how many people will benefit from documenting the turbo aspects of the twin cam rebuild.

It's quite amazing that he's documented stripping down the whole car and rebuilding it from the ground up. The content reminds me of the car restoration TV shows like Horsepower TV. They show very basic tips and tricks, but don't include nearly enough detail to do the job yourself without a manual. Great find none the less. Thanks for sharing!

GWise
March 16th, 2014, 12:14 PM
We finally got the car on the table at the beginning of March and found a slight tweak in the frame (not surprising for a 50 year old race car). We've spent the last couple Saturdays working on it. The frame is now straight and just needs to be braised back up and painted. I'm hoping to put the bodywork and suspension back on it saturday and get it back in my garage.

http://i60.tinypic.com/10qbggj.jpg

After dealing with a fiasco with a thicker head gasket, I just decided to drop it back off at the machine shop to increase the chamber volume and open up some space around the valves. The head is supposed to be finished this week (although it was supposed to be finished last week).

I also bought another lightweight muffler on the cheap with a turn-out already ready to go. Hopefully using the smaller muffler in combination with this one I'll be able to meet Laguna's strict sound regulations.

http://i61.tinypic.com/2zoeya0.jpg

MK1962
March 29th, 2014, 03:33 PM
Very very cool, great project.

Marshall

GWise
March 30th, 2014, 10:56 PM
Thanks Marshall.

http://i57.tinypic.com/2dij22h.jpg

Made a bit of progress today. The transmission mount I made worked out perfectly. We're out of the country the next 2 weekends, so I'm targeting to have it fired up by the end of April.

moosetestbestanden
March 31st, 2014, 02:10 PM
Keep em coming. This is a fine project!

slomove
March 31st, 2014, 08:09 PM
Looking good! I am not sure if the engine mounts are common for that type of engine but they look a little on the light side to me? I am asking especially since they look stainless (or are maybe chromed) and I did not have much luck with the fatigue resistance of stainless steel.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-GzeVa8V2tNw/Uzota06w1eI/AAAAAAAAEto/5wvZZ9bwJuA/w647-h862-no/DSC00195.JPG)

escondidoron
March 31st, 2014, 09:45 PM
Looking good! I am not sure if the engine mounts are common for that type of engine but they look a little on the light side to me? I am asking especially since they look stainless (or are maybe chromed) and I did not have much luck with the fatigue resistance of stainless steel.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-GzeVa8V2tNw/Uzota06w1eI/AAAAAAAAEto/5wvZZ9bwJuA/w647-h862-no/DSC00195.JPG)

Physically they look pretty much like my stock units on my S2. Except that they look to be painted silver. And the right hand side one looks to have been tweaked slightly for additional oil pump clearance.

GWise
March 31st, 2014, 10:50 PM
They definitely have been modified for pump clearance and are plated (and appear to have been repaired at least once!)

I'll keep my eye on them, but this doesn't quite have the torque of a modern zetec or duratec.

Gert - You get the award for best roadside maintenance preparedness and ingenuity. That repair is brilliant.

GWise
April 2nd, 2014, 07:42 PM
You all made me realize that I forgot to install the oil pump before I secured the right motor mount... add one more task to the list.

GWise
April 20th, 2014, 09:59 PM
http://youtu.be/eJSc2NNssyg

Not nearly done, but it runs and started on the first crank! I do enjoy the smell of exhaust from leaded race gas. I think the water pump may be leaking slightly (weep hole) and I need to get the exhaust manifold sealed better (challenging on pre-crossflows). The battery is also dead.

I still need to recheck head bolt torque, tighten up all the suspension, route the throttle cable, bleed the brakes, fill the transmission, mount the exhaust, and reinstall the bodywork before I take it for a spin.

After that: tune the carbs, clean up the wiring/plumbing, recheck valve clearances, recheck timing and relocate the battery/cutoff switch.

Sean
April 21st, 2014, 11:05 AM
Congratulations! :icon_encouragement:

GWise
April 27th, 2014, 08:22 PM
I did a bit more work today. The water pump does appear to be leaking out of the weep hole. My pulley is also not concentric and I tried frivolously to make it so to no avail. I'll probably just buy a pump and pulley from someone to make sure they're concentric.

I also noticed today that it does give off a puff of white smoke after it's been sitting at idle. I'm not sure if it's the rings or the valve guides. I didn't install stem seals, but maybe that'll be a future upgrade.

I'm also a bit puzzled with the shifter. When I had it out of the car, everything worked great. Now that it's in the car, it does not like to go into reverse and if you force it, the linkage pops out of the notch in the rail. The 2000E used in super 7's use a remote shifter - which uses a long shift linkage, so this is a bit of an awkward task anyway. I'll be spending more time fiddling with it.

I did get to take my first drive today around the block a few times. It was quite evident it still needs an alignment, but otherwise things went smoothly. Below are a few pictures after I gave it a well deserved wash

http://i57.tinypic.com/24dkepd.jpg
http://i62.tinypic.com/2a95jiq.jpg

A brief Task List: (I may as well use this forum for my task lists!)
Buy Water Pump/Pulley & Install
Buy Valve Stem Seals
Buy Battery & Install in new location + Remount Cut off switch (Looking into the Evo 2 here (http://www.ballisticparts.com/products/batteries/12cell.php) maybe 16 cell)
Buy solid rocker posts/solid spacers
Buy Harness for passenger seat (Really I'd just like to buy a pair with cam-locks, though I don't think I can bring myself to put on belts that say "caterham" on them)
Install Cosworth Cam cover and route tubing
Change oil and clean filter
Tune Carbs (they're surprisingly close)
Install Lights
Clean up plumbing/wiring
Fit Lightweight Exhaust and install O2 bung
Create and install board for boot.
+ Much more

escondidoron
April 28th, 2014, 08:26 AM
I

I did get to take my first drive today around the block a few times. …….. I gave it a well deserved wash



Looking very good. Nice progress. Isn't getting back behind the wheel wonderful?





I also noticed today that it does give off a puff of white smoke after it's been sitting at idle. I'm not sure if it's the rings or the valve guides. I didn't install stem seals, but maybe that'll be a future upgrade.



Not there to see the puff of white smoke, and while a rich mixture is usually dark smoke, could it be carburetion? Or heaven forbid, coolant?
You have carb balancing on your task list. Maybe this will clear up with a good Weber balancing/jetting session.




I'm also a bit puzzled with the shifter. When I had it out of the car, everything worked great. Now that it's in the car, it does not like to go into reverse and if you force it, the linkage pops out of the notch in the rail. The 2000E used in super 7's use a remote shifter - which uses a long shift linkage, so this is a bit of an awkward task anyway. I'll be spending more time fiddling with it.



Reverse on my three rail gearbox is a bit fiddley too. Our driveway has a bit of an uphill section when backing out and mine often pops out of gear when reversing there unless I hold it in place. I've had it apart a couple of times to no avail. All is set up properly. I think that there is simply not sufficient travel / linkage angle to get enough engagement / overcenter force with the remote to retain full engagement, at least on mine.





Buy Harness for passenger seat (Really I'd just like to buy a pair with cam-locks, though I don't think I can bring myself to put on belts that say "caterham" on them)



Lots of options out there: Simpson, Sabelt, G-Force, Corbeau, etc.
If you could stand the belts to say Lotus, maybe you could consider getting some of these anti-chafe comfort sleeves from ebay to cover the labels?
http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/m8liy5x-QoncbNmW2HiYVHQ.jpg





Fabricate license plate mount



I think that this Union Jack theme license plate support bracket that Randy Chase made is quite nice, even if not really visible once the plate is installed:
http://www.britishspeed.com/gallery3/var/resizes/Caterham-Build-R400/008-282487832.JPG?m=1336086877
Randy posts on this forum from time to time.

Looking forward to your next update. Keep 'em coming.

GWise
April 28th, 2014, 12:58 PM
I don't think that license holder will work. I've got an idea, of what I'd like to do, just need to execute.

Do you have a picture of your remote extension Ron? Because my car uses the less common triumph extension, it may not be the same. You may be able to prevent the shifter from popping out of reverse by adding a shim to the spring underneath the rail cover on the reverse rail (far passenger side).

I'll try to pull it out tonight to have a better look. I contacted Tom at Dave Bean and he's also offered to help me take a look (and sell me another water pump and pulley).

-Geoff

GWise
April 29th, 2014, 08:06 AM
Nevermind- I solved the issue last night. I removed the shim I added to the spring for the rod. It still isn't easy to get into reverse, but at least now it's possible.

GWise
May 25th, 2014, 09:38 AM
I ended up buying a ballastic 16 cell battery and I relocated the cutoff switch under the dash. I also did a string alignment and remounted the license plate. I used a dial indicator to center the water pump pulley, but it still seems to be leaking a bit so a replacement is required.

I took a brief drive over to see Sean last week and on the way home the car shut off. I look over to see the cutoff switch key laying on the floor, indicating I had not quite twisted it all the way - lesson learned. Unfortunately this killed the MSD, so I have it bypassed for now.

Yesterday I took my longest drive to the top of Hwy 9 and back. Overall it was a success, but the car likes to wander a bit. I know some of this is attributable to the bias ply tires, but I'm not sure I did the alignment quite right. I will have to take another look at it. Cornering feel is fantastic, but it doesn't have great traction on bumpy roads. I think the dampers need to be set a bit softer. Also - the car does have some heim joints, so the ride is somewhat rough.

Acceleration is good with lots of torque. The car weighs less than 1000 pounds, so I suppose it should be. I haven't really flogged it yet, but it should run out of steam around 5500-6000rpm due to the restriction of the head. Gear changes are crisp and the semi-close ratio gearbox is a great fit for a street car. The LSD is a nice addition from my old car - it really helps improve drive out from sharp corners. The car has a very lazy idle - it takes nearly 15 seconds for the idle to drop down at a stop. No flat spots or hesitation however.

Interior still needs some work. The wheel is a bit too big based on my seating position, but I'll make due for now. The car's chassis is exposed and my leg actually digs into the frame under hard cornering. I also do not like the wink mirror. It has to go. I plan to replace it with a spa design convex center mirror and I think I will buy a set of brooklands.

After the drive I pulled the plugs and came up with 185-195 across the board. Looking at the plugs, it looks like the front weber is right on while the rear is running a bit rich. I'll start playing with the carbs now .

Plenty of work still to do, but it's a bit more fun now that you get to reap the benefit from the hard work. I plan to progressively work my way up to longer drives and I hope to have the car in top shape for the norcal picnic in august. I suppose I'll stop boring you all with this thread now since it's just minor tweaking at this point.

Here's a few pics from a turnout on hwy 9:
http://i58.tinypic.com/25qrfr5.jpg
http://i62.tinypic.com/2nu7g4l.jpg
http://i59.tinypic.com/211q9oi.jpg

slomove
May 25th, 2014, 02:45 PM
....I suppose I'll stop boring you all with this thread now since it's just minor tweaking at this point.....

Bwaahhaahaaa. I am still doing "minor" tweaks after 11 years of ownwership ;-)

But seriously, the car looks great. Happy blatting and keep the shiny side up!

escondidoron
May 25th, 2014, 04:32 PM
Looking very nice!

GWise
March 17th, 2015, 09:10 AM
So, it’s been a while since I’ve been back here and I know I said I wouldn’t post about small things, but it’s been interesting to see what was on my priority list and what I actually came through with – almost like a time capsule.

My wife and I had a baby (our first) at the end of October, so I’ve been spending what little free time I have out in the garage. Here he is at 3 months a team lotus shirt that’s obviously a bit big for him.

http://i.imgur.com/WPMC6WF.jpg?1

If anyone else is interested for their children/grand children, I found it on ebay for $7 shipped from the UK. It’s official merchandise from Tony Fernandez’s failed operation.

I’ve been living with the puff of smoke off-idle so I’ll wait on the valve stems and the water pump stopped leaking when I switched to a lower pressure cap. I’ve been keeping a conservative redline of 5500 RPM due to the fact I haven’t upgraded any of the rocker hardware yet. The cosworth cam cover will be installed at the same time as the valve hardware.

The lights are wired up, but I prefer the look of the car without them and I cant get the nosecone off with them installed. I'll only put them on in the rare occasion I drive at night.

I also haven’t installed a rear boot yet because it hasn’t been a priority to carry anything and the exhaust is ready to go on once I source a new clamp.

The car now has Schroth 6 point (driver) and 4 point (passenger) belts. I chose Schroth because they use polyester webbing which ages a bit better than nylon and I’m not going to be replacing these every 2 years.

http://i.imgur.com/hj3Wxpx.jpg?1

I accidentally sprayed the previous windscreen with brake-fluid, so it was a good excuse to replace the ugly wink mirror as well. I fabricated a windscreen and purchased some racetech mirrors, seen below.

http://i58.tinypic.com/wcogec.jpg

The windscreen came out quite nice, but after further consideration I ended up purchasing a brooklands because I just prefer the classic look of them. I also intend the replace the small racetech center mirror with a larger one, but I’ll get a few more miles of use at of this setup before that happens.


I drove the car from April to November and really enjoyed it, but there was something strange in the front end that I just couldn’t quite put my finger on. I also decided it needed a different set of dampers.

I bought these aluminum shocks (saving 2.5 lbs per corner) from an outfit in the UK that valved them specifically them to my specifications with a dyno plot of each shock. Everything I’d read about other coilover shocks (AVO, pro-tech, GAZ, Carrera, QA1) was that they were designed and valved for larger cars allowing only 2-3 clicks of worthwhile adjustment in sevens – especially at the rears. They are also notorious for being inconsistent from shock to shock. I went with spherical balls to mitigate the binding associated with a solid rear axle. To finish out the coilovers, I bought a tested and matched set of 200lb/in front springs and 150lb/in rears.

[http://i.imgur.com/ZNUSVL3.jpg?1

I started to dig into the front end and found the top links were worn. I ordered a new set from caterham for a very reasonable $75 each (1/3 the cost of dave bean). As I got into the front uprights, I found out they were bent at the base, which explains my handling issue. I also found the wheel bearing had spun on the spindle, so I replaced the uprights, spindle, and both sets of wheel bearings. The wishbones obviously fabricated around the bent spindles, so I’ll be replacing those soon as well. Basically the car needed a completely new front end, which ended up costing a lot more and taking a lot longer than I expected. I just finally got the car on the ground this past week.

While I was waiting on suspension parts, I had a lot of time to tinker with some other things.

The car was fitted with a Autometer Tachometer which is great from an accuracy perspective, but just didn’t suit the style of gauge I liked. I found this vintage smiths tachometer off ebay for $25. It’s similar to the original style that came with the series 2, but they are notorious for being inaccurate. I upgraded the circuit board with modern day electronics. This converts the tach signal from voltage sensing to current sensing so it will work with an electronic ignition and can be calibrated to suit my needs. The other advantage is that I can calibrate as necessary. The video below shows it tested with a 9000RPM signal.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02ZRsqCMvHM

I’m not sure when I’ll get to installing this, but I traded an old block and rods to acquire this smiths chronometric tachometer. It was a pleasant surprise that it actually works (See the video below). This one will probably take some time to install since I’ll have to have the engine out to install the timing chain cover with cable drive. I’ve always wanted a chronometric tach after seeing the opening scene of the movie “grand prix.”

EDIT: only one video allowed - see next post

Finally, a guy I know makes these Porsche 917 style shift knobs. I had him build me one flipped so the layers are vertical. I’m not certain I like it since wood doesn’t really seem to suit the rest of the interior. I do plan on putting some lamiplate on the dash, so maybe that will help. I’d also like to go back to the original style lucas switches.

http://i.imgur.com/DyzYyqc.jpg?1

So my new list of things to do for the next year:
Re-do Battery Tie-Down (in the works)
Replace Wishbones
Add roll bar padding and headrest – I’ve needed to do this for quite a while. I suppose it’s pretty stupid to put it off.
Fit larger diameter tires – this will increase the ride height and improve the drive-ability. I personally think the sidewalls look too small for the proportions of the car right now and I’m 4000 RPM at 63mph.
Replace worn air-cleaners
Upgrade the Rocker hardware and install cosworth rocker cover
Install Exhaust
Buy center mirror and install brooklands
Install braided oil pressure line
Fabricate heat shielding for carbs/intake manifold from exhaust

I’d also like to do the following on a longer time scale:
Add lamiplate dash/lucas style switches
Install Chronometric Tachometer
Purchase Full Radius Air Horns and do more carburetor tuning.
Fabricate a lower seat
Source the correct style tail lights

I hope to take my first short drive since november this weekend; I’ll post up photos/video if that materializes.

It will be interesting to see what I get done again when I dig up this thread next year. ☺

GWise
March 17th, 2015, 10:08 AM
Here's the video of the chronometric tach, since I can only post one video per post.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYEUBy0N5rY

super7guy
March 18th, 2015, 09:53 AM
Enjoyed reading your thread.

Noticed that the tailhousing are quite different, The trans that I have has all of the shifter rods inside the tailhousing; maybe that it is a specialty of the GW tailhousing. Mine has a 2821E cast iron gear casing with the GW magnesium tailhousing. i will try to attach some pics, but the pics that I have are too big.

Wayne, SB1497

GWise
March 19th, 2015, 09:58 AM
Hi Wayne,

I think you have the integral remote tailhousing. There are magnesium versions of each. You can send your pictures to me at geoffwise at gmail . com and I can post them up for you. Would love to know more about SB1497...

GWise
March 19th, 2015, 10:57 PM
Wayne does have the integral housing, seen here:

http://i.imgur.com/Je0FL6W.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/Rq5W6mv.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/tr44mCi.jpg?1

GWise
March 22nd, 2015, 09:28 PM
Finally took a drive this weekend. Overall the dampening is excellent. The springs are perfect for smoother roads, but are a bit stiff for bumpy mountain roads. I took a couple videos which I'll post up eventually.

http://i.imgur.com/lgkzO7q.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/np7siCz.jpg?1